Best CyberPowerPC Cyber Monday Deals On Amazon 2020

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It’s no secret that CyberPower offers gaming desktops ad infinitum; I counted a lot more than 70 starting configurations on its website, and that is exclusive of retailer-specific models just like the Gamer Xtreme GXi11400CPG ($769.99 as tested). This budget-conscious midtower surprises with high-end touches for instance a tempered glass window and a trio of remote-controlled RGB-lit fans, while its perky Intel Core i3 processor and Nvidia GeForce GTX 1660 graphics card make an excellent pairing for smooth 1080p gaming. Although it’s built sufficiently and satisfactory performance, it can’t quite unseat our Editors’ Choice pick for value gaming rigs, the NZXT BLD Starter PC Plus, that provides better performance and an extended guarantee for very little more dosh.

Budget, HOWEVER, NOT Ultra-Budget
The Gamer Xtreme GXi11400CPG is a preconfigured tower with a four-core, four-thread Intel Core i3-9100F processor (3.6GHz clock, up to 4.2GHz boost); a 6GB GeForce GTX 1660 graphics card; 8GB of DDR4-2400 memory; a 512GB PCIe solid-state drive; and Windows 10 Home. This caliber of elements is mid-grade in the gaming-desktop world, as less costly parts can be found. (Namely, Intel’s Pentium-brand CPUs and Nvidia’s 4GB GeForce GTX 1650 Super or AMD’s Radeon RX 5500 XT.) Having said that, I would have recommended to start to see the GTX 1660 Super included for better still performance at minimal extra cost.

This CyberPower configuration holds its pricing ground next to the Dell G5 Gaming Desktop that I came across on the Dell site for the same price with the same basic hardware. A possible intensify may be the Asus ROG Strix GL10CS, that i entirely on Newegg for $849 with a faster Core i5-9400F CPU. NZXT’s BLD Starter PC is another rung up the ladder at $899, but further ups the ante with a GTX 1660 Super GPU, 16GB of RAM, and an extended two-year warranty.

To see what I possibly could save easily built it myself, I shopped the CyberPower’s pieces as closely as possible on Newegg to the tune of $720, or only $50 significantly less than its price tag. That’s just a tiny premium to cover another person to expertly assemble it, use a clean copy of Windows 10, and cover everything with something warranty. If there’s a concern, you just call CyberPower, whereas do-it-yourselfers would need to diagnose problems by themselves and then handle individual part vendors. CyberPower covers its tower with a one-year warrantee on parts, 3 years on labor (you’d purchase replacement parts beyond the first year, but labor will be covered for just two more years), and lifetime tech support team.

Aftermarket Vibes
The Gamer Xtreme runs on the CyberPower Onyxia chassis that’s very sturdy. Measuring 18.5 by 8.2 by 17.6 inches, it’s smack-dab in the centre ground for a midtower. The appearance is gamer without having to be garish.

The inner structure and almost all of the surface panels are steel, as the front and left panels are tempered glass. The latter offers a clear view of the roomy interiorā€¦

The blacked-out inside looks superior to bare steel. It could have the side aftereffect of making things too dark, but that isn’t a concern with this Gamer Xtreme; its three 120mm fans are brightly lit in RGB colors and fun patterns.

There is no software-level lighting control as I’d prefer, but CyberPower carries a wireless remote.

The four thumbscrews on the left side panel make interior access a straightforward affair. An Intel B360-based ASRock MicroATX motherboard is center stageā€¦

It isn’t strictly an off-the-shelf model, considering that its heatsink bears the CyberPower logo, but it’s likely an ASRock B360 Pro4. (The case does appear to be it could have a full-ATX board, though.) Among my review unit’s four DIMM slots is filled up with an 8GB ADATA XPG-brand memory module. Let me see a lot more than that in a gaming desktop, nonetheless it would be easy to add more by yourself. (Four 16GB DIMMs would hit the 64GB ceiling.) Left of the memory slots, an Intel factory heatsink and fan top the Core i3-9100F CPU.

Without impressive-looking, this cooling setup is properly adequate, as I’ll detail later. Further below may be the two-slot, two-fan MSI GeForce GTX 1660 Ventus XS OC graphics card. It’s shorter when compared to a normal card, but this tower evidently has no insufficient space for accommodating longer ones.

Not noticeable inside our images may be the M.2 slot beneath the graphics card that holds an Intel 9462 wireless card, which gives 802.11ac Wi-Fi and Bluetooth 5. The included antennas (not linked inside our photos) attach on the trunk of the motherboard. Moving onto storage, the Gamer Xtreme’s 512GB SSD resides just underneath the CPU in the motherboard’s M.2 Type-2280 slot. It is the only storage drive in this configuration.

This tower supports up to four additional SATA drives. Two 2.5-inch drives, that you will have to supply your own brackets, mount along with the energy supply compartment. Meanwhile, two 3.5-inch drives easily fit into a rack in the compartment, filled with toolless slide-out caddies.

The bottom-mounted power is a 600-watt Thermaltake Smart series unit with an 80 Plus Gold certification. It generally does not have modular cables which can be detached if they are not used, but CyberPower does a tidy job of routing and tying off the unused ones.

Desktop Port Variety
The tower’s front edge includes a couple of USB 3.1 Type-A ports and separate headphone and microphone jacks. Let me visit a USB-C port and a media card reader up here once and for all measure.

Backside, the motherboard has four USB 3.1 ports (three Type-A and one Type-C), two USB 2.0 ports, and an Ethernet jack, plus headphone, line-in, and line-out audio tracks jacks.

The motherboard’s HDMI port is disabled not merely as a result of the Nvidia GTX 1660 (which includes one HDMI and three DisplayPort video-out connectors), but also as the Core i3-9100F processor does not have any integrated graphics to fall back on. (That is true of most “F”-suffix Intel CPUs.)

Ready Player One
Now we’ll put the Gamer Xtreme to the test inside our benchmarking suite, where it’ll go head-to-head with the next units:

The quad-core CPUs in the CyberPower and HP will put them at a disadvantage in this lot, especially next to the eight-core Dell. Granted, those two will be the least-expensive machines here. Things otherwise look best for the CyberPower, especially in GPU terms, although the NZXT’s GTX 1660 Ti may be the speediest of the bunch. Nonetheless, let’s observe how things play out.

Storage, Media, and CPU Tests
The CyberPower commenced with a solid placement inside our PCMark 10 general performance benchmark, which simulates tasks like web browsing, office productivity, and video streaming. Scores above 4,000 points for the reason that test are ideal. In addition, it kept up nicely in the PCMark 8 Storage benchmark, where in fact the HP was dragged down by its slow hard disk drive.

Another two tests extract maximum effort from the CPU through the use of all available cores and threads. Cinebench R15 does so by rendering a complex image, while in Handbrake we encode a 12-minute clip of 4K video right down to 1080p.

Cinebench reveals that the CyberPower’s Core i3-9100F four-core chip (which doesn’t support thread-doubling Hyper-Threading) isn’t a significant match for the HP’s older Ryzen 5, and it naturally can’t measure to the higher-core-count chips in the other units in either test. It yet deserves consideration (and perhaps applause) to be the least-expensive CPU here, costing around $80 at retail. In my usage, I came across it offered a lot of pep for almost everything, rendering even complex websites very quickly.

Our Adobe Photoshop test may be the last one in this section. We use an early on 2018 Creative Cloud release of the program to use 10 complex filters and effects to a typical JPEG image, timing each procedure and adding up the full total. This test more heavily leverages the computer’s memory, storage, and potentially its GPU as well as the processor.

The CyberPower managed a good finish. The HP finished last mostly as a result of its slow storage, a deficiency the CyberPower doesn’t share.

Graphics Tests
We start this section with UL’s 3DMark suite; the Sky Diver test is for lighter-hitting systems with integrated graphics, while Fire Strike is targeted at high-performance PCs. Both tests simulate complex DirectX 11 scenes.

The CyberPower scored where it will, above the HP and Lenovo with their older (yet mainstream because of their time) graphics cards without quite catching the Dell, which teams the same GTX 1660 card with a considerably faster CPU. The NZXT and its own GTX 1660 Ti made the very best spot, as expected.

Our next test is another gaming simulator, Unigine’s Superposition. This a lot more demanding test runs on the different rendering engine to supply a second judgment on a PC’s graphics performance. The CyberPower edged the Dell here to take the silver medal.

Finally but perhaps most of all, we’ll test some real games. We utilize the built-in benchmarks in Far Cry 5 (at its Ultra image quality preset) and Rise of the Tomb Raider (at its HIGH preset) at 1080p, 1440p, and 4K resolutions. Far Cry 5 uses DirectX 11, while we flip the Lara Croft adventure to DirectX 12. The email address details are measured in fps (fps); we search for at least 60fps for smooth playability.

The CyberPower’s numbers reveal it is best fitted to 1080p gaming, though it’s with the capacity of venturing into 1440p territory. Lowering the settings just somewhat from these demanding presets should yield 60fps at the bigger resolution. As I noted earlier, the performance could possibly be better still if this Gamer Xtreme used the newer GeForce GTX 1660 Super rather than the initial GTX 1660, however the difference wouldn’t be earth-shattering.

This Gamer Xtreme’s biggest performance impediment is really its 8GB of memory. I noticed some extreme stuttering while playing Rise of the Tomb Raider plus some short-term sluggishness after exiting the overall game, both telltale indicators that Windows 10 needs more memory. I didn’t have other programs running at that time, either. Upping the full total to 16GB (a comparatively easy and economical aftermarket job) should mitigate that problem.

The quad-core/quad-thread processing power of the Core i3-9100F is another potential weak spot, although it’s flawlessly with the capacity of modern gaming if you are not putting an excessive amount of extra load onto it. It can be strained if you are trying to livestream your games, for example, a situation in which a six- or eight-core CPU, plus AMD’s or Intel’s thread-doubling, will be worthwhile.

Colorful Cooling
The airflow in the Gamer Xtreme is easy yet efficient, with two 120mm fans drawing air in from the proper side and another sending it out the trunk. The noise level isn’t accurately quiet, but it’s muted enough to camouflage itself as background noise generally in most situations. Gaming for extended periods didn’t seem to be to improve the revs much, if, and I had to strain my ears to listen to the fans on the CPU and graphics card.

The inner component temperatures were very good in my own gaming sessions; my log showed the GTX 1660 topping out in the upper 60 degree C range, or far below its maximum rating. The Core i3-9100F fared better still, not moving away from the 40 degree C range. That is one midtower which has no issue keeping its cool.

A Sensible Budget Gaming Pick
CyberPower’s knack for providing value is alive and well in the Gamer Xtreme GXi11400CPG. This midtower doesn’t skimp on premium features to supply all the performance necessary for running today’s games at 1080p resolution. It might use a lot more than 8GB of memory, but that isn’t hard to add down the road. Our only reservation with this tower is that the NZXT BLD Starter PC and its own Plus variant provide substantially more performance and an extended guarantee for very little more. If a budget doesn’t take you that far, this CyberPower won’t cause you to wish you spent extra.

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