Dewalt Tools: Should You Consider This in 2020? Get Black Friday Deals & Discount

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DeWalt makes a whole lot of excellent tools, but our DeWalt tool reviews separate the true winners from the run-of-the-mill. From the brand new DeWalt FlexVolt concrete saw to the wonderful DeWalt DWV012 HEPA dust extractor, there’s too much to like. Our hands-on approach combines in-house scientific testing with real-world consumption to determine if tools just like the DeWalt Tool Connect hammer drill are anything special.

Dewalt Tool Connect may be the latest technology out of this tool company, however, not all DeWalt tools feature it. Their FlexVolt battery technology is first rate with hybrid 20V and 60V applications. DeWalt FlexVolt tools also run longer, faster, and with an increase of power than their 18V tools.

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Last update was on: November 28, 2020 6:28 pm

DeWalt Tool Reviews with Hands-on Testing


The next DeWalt tool reviews endure a blend of trade-specific testing with rugged testing in the PTR Shop. You’ll see that people cover the gamut, from DeWalt hand tools to power tools and outdoor power equipment.

Pros

  • Bump fires with little delay
  • Loading nails is easy and familiar if you’re used to pneumatic guns
  • 3 fastener length settings on the magazine
  • Depth adjustment is simple to manipulate
  • Effective blade release lever
  • Plenty of capacity to fully drive roofing nails with regular depth

Cons

  • Magazine cover is somewhat flimsy and will pop open
  • Motor requires a moment to spool up before you start nailing
  • Heavier and bulkier than pneumatic (common to cordless nailers)

DeWalt 20V Max Cordless Roofing Nailer

I had a roofing project prearranged and brought the DeWalt DCN45RN to observe how well it could continue against my pneumatic nailers. We were completely removing the old roofing materials and replacing it with new waterproofing, flashing, and architectural shingles.

With a storm system heading in, time was of the essence. While we worked on a lot of the roof with air guns, I used the DeWalt cordless roofing nailer around the double chimney, in the valley, where I started the tiered rows, and where I finished them off on the ends.

First Impressions


Right out of your gate, I could get started minutes prior to the remaining guys since I didn’t have a hose and compressor to create. In addition, it made climbing easier without the hose dragging behind.

The nailer is evidently heavier and bulkier compared to the pneumatic models. It’s not really a surprise, though. Needing to pack the complete power source onto and in to the tool requires that sort of trade-off.

Still, I possibly could jump around and hit those smaller tasks and leave the production shingling to all of those other guys. It wasn’t just the short-term thrill of running a new tool. The quick start and freedom to go are things I’ve enjoyed on other jobs that followed, too.

No Trouble Adjusting


Getting into the work, I had a need to set the proper nail depth. The adjustment knob is at the top where it’s simple to access. There are 5 positions to click into and it’s simple to grip when you’re wearing gloves.

There are three magazine positions aswell. To modify it, rotate the tray out, push it to the particular level you want, and rotate it back. Put your coil as high as 120 nails in and you’re all set.

We were utilizing 1 3/4-inch, 15º wire collated nails with 1 1/4-inch nails on several other jobs. In both cases, making the nail size and depth adjustments were easy first steps.

Nailing Performance


Switching from a pneumatic roofing nailer, going cordless requires a little used to. You should supply the trigger a pull and allow motor spin up for another or two before it’s prepared to fire. Once it really is, you can bump fire along at a regular rate.

While we don’t view it as a problem, remember that this nailer only includes a bump fire mode.

You’re not likely to see pneumatic speed here. You can fire roughly 3 nails per second. I came across that to be plenty for the elements of the roof I was focusing on. Even in the production areas, it’s not an excessive amount of a slowdown.

With both nail sizes we’ve been using inside our DeWalt 20V Max cordless roofing nailer, we haven’t had any problems with the nailer driving to the depth we wish and with regular results.

Nail jams and misfires were few in number. We’re not surprised or disappointed by the kinds we’d. We didn’t have any jams and the few misfires we’d all appeared to be the consequence of the wire fouling instead of failing to fire properly.

Runtime


With a 2.0Ah battery, you will probably get about 500 shots-roughly a square worth of roofing (~100 square feet).

DeWalt kits their cordless roofing nailer with a 2.0Ah battery once and for all reason: it’s not really a light tool. At 7.6 pounds with the battery, popping a FlexVolt 12.0 onboard to increase your runtime may appear like a good notion, but it’s likely to be crazy-heavy.

Additional Field Notes


The one issue we’d during our testing is that the magazine popped open several times. The magazine and its own catch are plastic and just a little flimsy. It’s sufficient for the magazine tab to slide out and start. It doesn’t happen {at all times|constantly|on a regular basis|continuous

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