Best Sony KD70X690E 4K TV Deals On Black Friday 2020

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The Sony X690E (KD-70X690E) is big – it’s a lot more than 5 feet across and will be offering an impressive amount of viewable property. As Ultra HD resolution makes larger displays more watchable because of an increased pixel density, the cost of 4K panels has dropped rapidly, making extra-large TVs less expensive than ever. Which size makes for a far more immersive viewing experience.

Design

The 70-inch Sony looks excellent, with fairly slim, black bezels around the display and an understated design. IT chassis includes a glossy, black finish around the bezel, and a set, black finish on the backside. The whole lot is constructed of black plastic that’s serviceable but isn’t particularly premium.

At a complete 70 inches (measured diagonally, from corner to corner), the X690E may be the most significant TV we’ve ever brought into our labs and will be offering even more viewable property compared to the 65-inch Vizio SmartCast M-Series M65-E0 and the 65-inch Samsung MU7000.

Nonetheless it does bring some challenges of its. Measuring 61.7 x 35.5 x 3.7 inches, the 70-inch X690E can’t go just anywhere. Wall mounting can be an option – it supports mounting with a 400 x 400-millimeter VESA mount – but if you wish to place it on an entertainment unit or table, you will have to be sure to have the required clearance.

The included stand is constructed of a strong black plastic with a matte finish and includes a U-shaped footprint with a squared-off design measuring 25 inches wide and 12 inches deep. That’s small enough to match on a standard entertainment unit, but you will still must ensure you have a good amount of clearance on both sides to support the 62-inch width of it.

You can also want to make certain you have room for comfortable viewing, since such a sizable TV is able to overwhelm a smaller apartment or living room and cause you to feel just like you’re sitting in leading row of a cinema. According to your guide to TV screen size, the perfect viewing distance for a 70-inch display is 6 feet.

Ports and Connections

The TV’s connections are available on two connector panels on the trunk left-hand side of the set.

The more accessible of both is defined roughly 8 to 10 inches in from the edge of the display and includes two HDMI ports (one with ARC), an RF connector for an antenna and three USB ports.

Another rear-facing panel on the trunk has connections for a third HDMI port, composite video and Ethernet for network connectivity. The set also offers built-in 802.11ac Wi-Fi, that allows you to really get your smart TV on your own network with out a wired connection.

Performance

The X690E’s good-enough display quality doesn’t quite match the expectations you may have for the cinema-like display. Colors are obvious and bright, but they’re also oversaturated and ever-so-slightly skewed. And the entire color reproduction isn’t quite as vibrant since it could be, because of a slightly lower color gamut.

When watching the trailer for Solo: A Star Wars Story, I was impressed with the flashes of color, whether from Lando Calrissian’s yellow shirt, a villain’s blood-red cape, or the red-and-blue glow of sci-fi jets.

More specific performance checks showed realistic skin tones in movies like Arrival, where a lot of the film centers around human faces. Whether it had been Amy Adams or Forest Whitaker on-screen, the faces looked clear and lifelike.

Oddly, the X690E has only three main display settings: Standard, Vivid and Custom. Additional modes, such as for example Cinema and Game modes, can be found, but they’re under another menu in the settings, called Scene Select.

Most TVs have poor color accuracy in Standard mode but offer far better accuracy in Cinema mode. Regarding the X690E, however, the performance was the very best in the typical mode, with a Delta-E score of 8.2 (nearer to zero is way better). This actually isn’t out of line because of this mode; the Vizio M65-E0 had a Delta-E of 10.4 under similar settings, and the Sony XBR-X900E registered 8.7. However, those two sets also had far better numbers in several display modes (1.4 and 2.1, respectively).

The color gamut, however, is good however, not great, with the X690E reproducing 99.2 percent of the Rec 709 color space. While other sets edge ahead with higher percentages – the 65-inch Samsung MU7000 had 99.8, and the Vizio M65-E0 scored a good 100 – it’s still high enough to be acceptable.

Viewing angles are fairly wide, with minor color shifting occuring at roughly 45 degrees off-center, which isn’t bad. Even smaller panels, just like the 55-inch Samsung MU6300, are large enough to induce some color shifting regardless if you do not change the viewing angle, yet it doesn’t happen with the 70-inch Sony.

Low-light environments were sufficiently dark however, not so inky black concerning render shadowy scenes hard to view. A shadowy alleyway in Deadpool, for instance, was dark, but details like bricks on the wall and small touches on characters’ costumes could be seen clearly. On the other hand, most OLED displays provide deepest blacks on a display but often crush the blacks in shadowy images, leaving muddy details and near-black factors that are difficult to tell apart. The backlight has some shadowing in the corners of the panel. But they’re fairly minor, and I was actually expecting them to be worse.

Audio

The X690E’s music quality was very good, thanks to some 10-watt speakers. The entire volume was strong, easily filling our testing lab whether we were watching THE PURCHASE PRICE Is Right or the trailer for Avengers: Infinity War.

When we paid attention to Deadmau5’s “Seeya,” the clarity was very good, with ideal performance between 20 and 70 percent volume. In this range, the bass levels were about as effective as you’ll get with out a subwoofer, and the treble was crisp and clear, with Colleen D’Agostino’s vocals coming through without distortion.

Anything over 70 percent began to sound distorted. Bass lost its bounce, vocals sounded tinny and distant and, when pushed up to 85 percent, it chassis began to reverberate, leading to hook buzz.

Smart TV Features

The X690E’s menus are fairly opaque, even though basic adjustments to the picture mode and brightness are simple to find, other settings aren’t. We’ve already touched on the issue of locating the various picture modes, where some modes can be found right in the display settings, and others – including Cinema, Game and Sports modes – require finding another settings menu, beneath the confusing name Scene Select. But that’s definately not the only point of confusion or irritation in these menus.

To carefully turn HDR functionality on / off, for instance, we first had to go in to the settings for each and every HDMI port and permit HDR input from an external device. Unless you permit this feature first, it will be possible to get HDR content only from streaming sources, regardless if it’s your HDR-enabled, Sony-made PlayStation 4 Pro. That’s an extraordinarily clunky way to take care of one of the key selling points of the set.

Then there’s the decision of smart TV platform. This model line uses the Sony Internet TV platform, that is a very bland name for Opera’s smart TV platform with a custom skin. Weighed against the Android TV options offered on Sony’s other sets, that is a genuine letdown. The tile-icon layout is usable, but to get additional apps, you will need to feel the Opera TV iphone app first.

The application selection isn’t great. As the TV includes well-known software like Amazon Video, Crackle, Hulu, Netflix and YouTube preinstalled, you will be hard-pressed to find any other software you might expect. The choice drops off sharply in quality, and you will rapidly end up sifting through software that consist totally of public-domain films, foreign-language content and amateur comedy shows better suitable for YouTube. Mainstream viewing options from networks and studios you’d know are almost totally absent.

Opera does boast some games content, but it offers the same lackluster options. Among the highlighted software promoted in Opera’s iphone app selector are games like Rock Swapper and Pentominoes – low-rent knockoffs of Bejeweled and Tetris, respectively.

Remote Control

While it might not exactly have the Android TV interface we liked so much on the Sony XBR65X900E, the X690E has the same handy remote control. Unfortunately, Sony’s chunky remote design is our least favorite from any major manufacturer. The rectangular condition isn’t particularly comfortable to carry, however the bigger sin is that the layout is confusing.

The remote has 49 buttons crammed onto its rectangular face, even though many of these are straightforward – like channel and volume controls, and basic number input – others aren’t. Most frustrating may be the directional pad, which is surrounded by six navigational buttons. I cannot find out why, but I don’t believe I’ve encountered the same collection of navigation buttons on any Sony remote. Here, the buttons are labeled Home, Options, Wide (for wide-screen aspect ratio), Display, Sleep and Return.

Not only may be the layout unintuitive, however the proximity of the Sleep button to the Return button signifies that when navigating through Netflix or YouTube, you may accidentally activate the TV’s sleep timer. That’s just bad design, and it’s really strange to visit a company like Sony have a problem with such a basic aspect of it experience.

Bottom Line

If you’re buying huge TV, the Sony X690E can be an OK midrange 4K set. The display quality and sound are fairly good and the feature selection is less exciting than how many other Sony models offer, but it’s usable. The large 70-inch display may be the source of a lot of this set’s cost, and $1,299 isn’t half harmful to a TV that stretches a lot more than 5 and half feet from corner to corner.

But despite having the silver screen and decent performance, this Sony TV is suffering from some curiously poor decisions in its remote design and menu layout, which will make it difficult to use a number of the features that may have sold you on the display to begin with. For a screen that’s practically as big but without the irritating menus and lackluster performance, consider the 65-inch Samsung MU7000 or Sony’s own XBR-65X900E. Both of these sets offer superior performance and a far more polished user experience for a similarly affordable price.

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