Best WD Red 4TB Black Friday Deals 2020

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WD’s Red 4TB HDD expands on the business’s current offering with 33% more raw storage capacity than previously obtainable in the same 3.5″ form factor with a 6Gb/s SATA interface. The WD Red line also features 1TB, 2TB, and 3TB models, however now consumers and smaller businesses with one- to five-bay NAS units can install or upgrade fully 4TB maximum, the most robust storage capacity in the market. Other standard features with the Red 4TB certainly are a 64MB cache and WD’s Intellipower low power spindle. This Intellipower technology is significant as drives in this segment experience continuous 24×7 procedure and are necessary to consume minimal levels of energy so as to reduce costs.

WD’s Red 4TB HDD expands on the business’s current offering with 33% more raw storage capacity than previously obtainable in the same 3.5″ form factor with a 6Gb/s SATA interface. The WD Red line also features 1TB, 2TB, and 3TB models, however now consumers and smaller businesses with one- to five-bay NAS units can install or upgrade fully 4TB maximum, the most robust storage capacity in the market. Other standard features with the Red 4TB certainly are a 64MB cache and WD’s Intellipower low power spindle. This Intellipower technology is significant as drives in this segment experience continuous 24×7 procedure and are necessary to consume minimal levels of energy as a way to reduce costs.

NAS hard disks aren’t necessarily necessary to be the best performing drives available. For most buyers, the principal considerations are reliability and warrantee along with the capacity points offered. The forex market also places more importance how the drive will probably operate over its lifespan. That isn’t to say performance is not a possible deliberation, and the WD Red includes a quoted transfer rate around 150MB/s.

The WD Red ships with features to improve the performance and reliability of the drive. 3D Active Balance Plus is a dual-plane balance control technology that enhances overall drive performance and reliability by reducing vibration and its own associated deterioration on internal components. WD uses NASware firmware on all Red HDDs, with version 2.0 standard on the 4TB model. This firmware reduces noise and power consumption, permits users to monitor performance and reliability via the SMART command set, and error recovery tools.

Design and Build

The WD Red 4TB includes a design like the WD Red 3TB we reviewed. The very best of the drive features the WD branding on something information label. As the 3TB model features four black stickers covering screws at the top cover, this 4TB model includes six.

Standard for WD HDDs, your body of the WD Red 4TB HDD is black metal. On the trunk of the drive, there are standard power and SATA connectors. Moving to underneath, to eliminate the circuit board, we had a need to remove four screws. The circuit board incorporates thermal pads to passively cool the inner components.

The WD Red 4TB HDD utilizes the Marvell 88i9446-NDB2 controller together with 64MB of DRAM cache from the SKhynix H5PS5162GFA.

In the first workload, we measured an extended sample of random 4k performance with 100% write and 100% read activity. The WD Red 4TB scored 107 IOPS read and 137 IOPS write, inserting it in the center of the distribution of results, and notably much better than the Red 3TB.

Inside our average latency segment with lots of 16T/16Q, the WD Red 4TB again scored in the center of the comparables.

The 4K maximum latency benchmark may be the first place the Red 4TB distinguishes itself: a 4,799ms maximum read latency may be the lowest among comparables. Its 5,012ms maximum write latency represents the center of the road.

Charting standard deviation further illustrates that the WD Red 4TB is competitive among large HDDs suitable for NAS applications.

Mixed workload profiles scale performance across a variety of thread and queue depth combinations. In the next benchmarks, we scale the workload from 2 threads and 2 queue depth up to 16 threads and 16 queue. In the 8k 70/30 test, the WD Red 4TB generally performed near to the middle of its comparables, apart from strong performance with two threads and relatively deep queues.

Average latencies for the WD Red 4TB were again in the center of the pack, but its performance was aligned a lot more closely with the Seagate’s Constellation CS and the WD Se 4TB than with either the Seagate NAS or the WD Red 3TB.

Apart from a jump in maximum latency at a thread count of two and high queue depths, the same points as the WD Red 4TB achieves high throughput, the Red 4TB performs about average through the entire 8K maximum latency benchmark. It’s performance at the best workloads is again nearer to the Constellation CS 4TB and the Se 4TB compared to the other comparables.

The typical deviation chart illustrates that with regards to the 8k benchmark, the WD Red 4TB’s performance may be the middle of the street for the comparables, and constantly superior to both Seagate NAS 4TB and the WD Red 3TB.

The 128k test is a huge block sequential benchmark that presents the best sequential transfer speed for a platter drive with 100% write and 100% read activity. Here, the Red 4TB performs most much like its sibling Red 3TB, to arrive with only slightly better sequential throughput in both read and write operations.

The File Server profile puts the drives through a varying workload with a thread and queue count that scales from 2T/2Q up to 16T/16Q. The WD Red again exhibits strong performance with two threads and a deep queue, but otherwise remains in the median position.

The WD Red 4TB performs well, however, not exceptionally in the file server average latency evaluation.

Apart from strong performance in low thread, low queue scenarios, the Red 4TB maintains its middle position through the entire maximum latency benchmark.

The typical deviation chart further highlights the strong performance at a thread count of two and queue of sixteen. Otherwise, the Red 4TB will not stick out among the comparables but does constantly outperform the Seagate NAS 4TB and the Red 3TB.

THE NET Server test is made up of 100% read activities across our selection of threads and queue depths. Much like almost all of the other benchmarks, the Red 4TB performs much better than the Seagate NAS 4TB and WD Red 3TB however, not and also the Constellation CS 3TB or Se 4TB.

The Red 4TB beats out the other NAS-tuned drives in the net server average latency benchmark aswell.

The WD Red 4TB is again weak in the same parts of the two-thread web server maximum latency test where it performs well with regards to throughput, but otherwise puts in a regular performance throughout this maximum latency profile.

At this time in the benchmarks, we are arriving at expect performance much better than the Seagate NAS and smaller Red drives, which is what we find with the net server standard deviation benchmark.

Synology DiskStation DS1513+ Performance

In the next half of the review, we show the performance of both new 3.5″ WD Red 4TB and the two 2.5″ WD Red 1TB HDD. WD supplied StorageReview with 5 samples of both new drives, which we configured in RAID5 inside our Synology DiskStation DS1513+. Leveraging SMB/CIFS shares we show how well a 50GB test sample size performed on each storage array we created.

Inside our first test measuring 4K random performance, the 3.5″ WD Red 4TB and 2.5″ WD Red 1TB both offered a intensify in performance when compared to original 3TB WD Red, although still came up slightly behind the Seagate 4TB NAS HDD. The brand new 1TB WD Red offered storage read performance, although weaker write performance in the group.

Average latency from the 4TB and 1TB WD Red ranked middle of the pack, showing improvements over the first-generation 3TB WD Red.

Comparing max latency, the 1TB and 4TB WD Red both came in at the front end when it found peak read latency, although the two 2.5″ 1TB Red came in in the bottom of the pack using its higher write latency.

Looking at latency consistency, the 1TB WD Red came in near the top of the pack when it found read standard deviation, but slipped to the trunk in respects to its write performance.

Our next test shifts focus from a pure 4K random read or write scenario to a mixed 8K 70/30 workload. We show how performance scales in this setting from 2T/2Q up to 16T/16Q. When it came right down to the drive that offered the very best 8K 70/30 throughput, all drives performed very close when configured in RAID5 inside our Synology NAS. Comparing first and second generation Red HDDs, the 4TB model did offer some gains over the 3TB version according to the workload intensity, although those gains did narrow in a few spots. Slotting among the 3TB and 4TB Red models, the 1TB 2.5″ version became quite capable.

Average latency ranked very close when you compare all of the NAS-specific models inside our 8K 70/30 test, with the 4TB WD Red and 4TB Seagate NAS both edging towards leading of the group, and the 1TB Red to arrive towards the middle.

Looking at max latency, there wasn’t a really clear winner inside our 8K 70/30 test, with most drives trading positions across our different thread/queue levels.

Switching our focus from peak latency to latency consistency inside our standard deviation test, the 1TB 2.5″ Red and previous-generation 3TB 3.5″ Red slightly edged out the other models under more stressful conditions.

While the first section of the workload comparison measured random workload performance, our second half measures small and large-block sequential transfer speeds. Inside our first test we measure 8K sequential performance, which we find the 4TB and 1TB WD Red models slipping behind slightly in read performance when compared to 3TB Red, although both offered faster write performance. The first choice in this specific test though may be the Seagate 4TB NAS that offered both higher read and write throughput.

Our last test talks about large-block sequential performance, which both 1TB and 4TB WD Red lead the group in. The two 2.5″ model offered the best read performance by a slim margin, although when you compare write speed it came in third place. The brand new 4TB WD Red though came in with the next highest read speed and best-in-class write performance.

Conclusion

The WD Red HDDs were created as the simple response to the question: Which hard disk drive should I install in my own NAS? Predicated on its constant performance inside our benchmarks, this is a good choice for NAS owners seeking to maximize the capability of their network storage device. The Red 4TB outperforms the Seagate NAS 4TB along with the WD Red 3TB inside our single drive benchmarks, while often managing performance near that of the Seagate Constellation CS or WD Se. When devote a multi-drive environment which these NAS HDD models were created for, the 4TB Red offered competitive performance in both random and sequential workloads, and shined when it found offering a number of the strongest large-block sequential read and write speeds.

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